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CTS GENERAL GUIDELINES


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#1  WaGGy

WaGGy

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    • Referred By:Soompi
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    Posted 27 Feb 12 - 03:33 PM

    CTS Subtitle Guidelines

    (Last Update: May 17, 2012)

    PLEASE make sure that before you start subbing you have read all the guidelines listed below. The guidelines are to be followed at all times!

    The purpose of the guidelines is to create uniformity and consistency in structure and composition of our subtitles. The updated (2012) CTS Guidelines are divided into 2: FORM and FORMAT. FORM will include rules in Translation, Interpretation & Grammar, while FORMAT will show how the lines should look like in different situations (italicized or with symbols = =, -= =- etc)

    Continued violation of any of these rules may lead to warning or banning of your account. We are hoping for your cooperation and compliance. Thank you smile.gif


    CONTENT:
     

    A. FORM

    1. Translation VS. Interpretation
    2. Romanizaton
    3. Korean Names and Titles
    4. Proper Nouns, Contractions and Slang
    5. Translation Exceptions and Conditions
    6. Grammar in respect to the dialogue
    7. Grammatical Person


    B. FORMAT


    1. Cutting long lines
    2. Two Characters Speaking in One Scene/Line
    3. When to use Italics

    3.1. Flashbacks
    3.2. Read my mind
    3.3. Unseen Speaker

    4. When to use the Symbols

    4.1. Explanations
    4.2. Audio
    4.3. Lyrics
    4.4. Interrupted lines

    5. Numbers

    5.1. Money
    5.2. Age, Counting and other numbers

     
     

     

    ===================================
    A. FORM


    1. Translation VS. Interpretation

    Translate the lines as closely as possible to their true meaning. When translating or editing, we need to have respect for the writers of the show. Shortening the lines too much may reduce the emotional impact of the scene as well as the characterization.

    Basic Korean terms that do not have exact English translation are to be retained, same with Sageuk terms and some Korean idioms. We want to retain the "Korean feel" by not giving our own interpretation of their culture but by simply translating them the best way they could be understood in English. You can make adjustments since the Korean Language has a different grammatical structure compared to the English structure. Remember that these subtitles are created for English speaking viewers.


    2. Romanizaton
    DarkSmurfSub is using the official Korean Government Romanization system (KRS), sometimes referred to as the Revised Romanization of Korean (RRKS). ALL the subtitles will use the KRS - including the names of the characters, places, and terms.

    For every kdrama there is a Character Spelling Reference that you must follow. There is also a General Comment box in the Dungeon that serves as a reference for every drama. Please make sure you have them before subbing.

    More information about KRS here: Learning Korean Lesson.


    3. Korean Names and Titles

    Korean names are written in all official records with three separate words without a hyphen. We want our subs to follow the official records, so the Korean names in the subs will be written like the examples below:

    Correct:
    Lee Jun Ki
    Gim Sam Sun
    Lee Seo Jin

    Incorrect:
    Lee Jun-ki
    Kang Dong-hyeok

    For titles, we will use Mr./Mrs./Ms./Miss and NOT -ssi/-shi/-ah. The context or surrounding conditions will tell which one needs to be used.

    For example:
    (Formal situation: two colleagues meeting for the first time.)
    Line 1: I am Lee Jun Ki, your new coleague. It is really nice to finally meet you, Miss Gim Che Ri.
    Line 2: Nice to meet you, Mr. Lee Jun Ki. I hope we will get along very well.

    (Informal situation: a romantic couple on a date.)
    Line 1: I’m glad that you came with me, Che Rim.
    Line 2: I was really happy when you invited me, Su Bin.

    This rule only applies when both speakers address each other with the same Korean honorifics (-ssi/-shi). If only one of the speakers addresses to the other one using honorifics and the other one doesn’t (and uses –ah) then even in informal situations, we will still use Mr./Mrs./Ms./Miss.

    For example:
    (A conversation between an ajussi and a younger woman.)
    Line 1: I’m glad that you came with me, Che Rim.
    Line 2: I was really happy when you invited me, Mr. Su Bin.

    We want to make things more simple and understandable in English. The suffix –ah doesn’t mean anything so we will just use the name of the person.

    Korean’s seldom use 'you' when communicating. They usually use the titleof the person like doctor, president, officer, teacher, etc. which will look as if they are talking to a 3rd person (this is related to Part 7 of the CTS Guidelies). In such cases, even if the title was mentioned, the pronoun ‘YOU’ has to be used in place of the title.

    One particular set of titles that are often misinterpreted are ‘seonsaeng’ and ‘seonsaengnim’. Seonsaeng, when used alone, means ‘teacher’, but used with the honorific suffix -nim, making it seonsaengnim, would be a title of respect to the person you are referring to and this is NOT necessarily just for teachers (doctors are sometimes addressed this way too). Unless otherwise specified, this is usually translated as Mr./Mrs./Ms./Miss.

    In the case of an argument between two characters about the way they call each other (with or without using the honorifics), we will be following the same rule and will be adding between "( )" to provide an explanation.

    For example:
    Line 1: Sam Sun! Sam Sun!
    Line 2: Mr. Jun Ki, why do you call me like that? Do I still look like a student to you? From now on please call me "Miss Sam Soon".
    (They argue about the usage of honorifics.)

    Abbreviate titles if they are used in the line, especially the long ones.

    For example:
    Line 1. This is Prof. Lee Myeong Han and Dr. Ju In Hyeok of the National Forensic Service.

    But write the complete title if it is the only word used in the line. For example:
    Line 1. Dr. Yun, please consider it.
    Line 2. Doctor...
    Line 3. doctor!


    4. Proper Nouns, Contractions and Slang

    Proper nouns should be capitalized and this includes the days of the week (Monday – Sunday), names, address, and including the ‘Won’ (monetary unit of Korea).

    Contractions are allowed (not compulsory) but slang words are prohibited. A contraction is the shortening of a word, syllable, or word group by omission of internal letters, while slang is the use of informal words and expressions that are not considered standard.

    Examples of contractions (allowed)
    I am – I’m
    I will – I’ll
    will not – won’t

    Examples of slang (NOT allowed)
    Want to – wanna
    Going to – gonna
    Want to be – wannabe

    COMMON MISTAKES

    For the purpose of simplicity, do not capitalize or italicize words for emphasis. One exclamation point or one question mark is enough for one line. Please do not make the exclamation point or question mark a volume or intensity indicator of the character’s voice and emotion, just let the actor’s dramatic or comedic talent convey the feeling of the scene.

    No need to write asterisk (*) to hide letters in swear words. Also, you are not obliged to tone them down because swearing is part of the script and it affects the characterization of the actor.

    Do this:
    Line 1: I hate you! You bastard!
    Line 2: I don’t want to see your face again!
    Line 3: But why? Why? Tell me please, I beg you...


    Don’t do this:
    Line 1: I hate you! You bast**d!!
    Line 2: I don’t want to see your face again!!!!
    Line 3: But why?? WHY!?! Tell me please, I beg you...

    Don’t use double periods for long pauses. In the English grammar there is no such thing as "..". We do have something called the ellipsis, which is three periods (...), and can be used for long pauses should a comma not be sufficient. When the use of ellipsis or any other form of punctuation is needed, do NOT add in a space in between the word and the punctuation.

    Correct:
    Line 1: This... is correct.
    Line 2: So, can you see that this is better?

    Incorrect:
    Line 1: This ... is not correct.
    Line 2: This...is also not correct.
    Line 3: So , can you see that this is not right?

    Don’t use the semicolon ( ; ) and limit the use of ampersand ( & ). Ampersand represents the word ‘and’. It is usually used in correspondence only within proper names and abbreviations such as Dow Jones & Company, Inc. Unless it is used in such a manner, refrain from using an ampersand to shorten the lines. A Semicolon is not something that is used or even noticed in verbal communication. It is only in written communication. It is not needed in subtitles.


    5. Translation Exceptions and Conditions

    All words will be translated into English except for a select group of words. These words are exempted from translation because their usage depends on the speaker and the situation. There will be a special case rule for these words to help the viewers understand the meaning of the words.

    The following words will be exempt. These words only apply to Korean Dramas and please take note of the spelling. These words are common nouns hence they should not be capitalized. Only when they are the first word in the sentence should they be capitalized.

    The contextual meanings to be used are also listed beside the word:

    aigoo - oh dear, oh my god
    aja - fighting
    ajumma - older lady, aunt
    ajussi - older man, uncle
    dongsaeng - younger brother or sister
    eonni - older sister
    hubae - junior classmate, colleague
    hyeong - older brother
    hyeongnim - respected older brother
    nuna - older sister
    nunim - respected older sister
    omo/omona - oh my
    oppa - older brother, boyfriend
    seonbae - senior, mentor
    seonbaenim - respected senior, mentor
    seonsaeng - teacher
    seonsaengnim - respected teacher


    In Korean language like in all languages there words and terms that cannot be translated in English. For example: “soju”, “gisaeng” and others. These terms and their explanation are included in the CTS Guide 3 – EXTENTED K-DRAMA EXEMPTION LIST.

    To help viewers understand what these terms, we will place the contextual meaning in parenthesis “( )” below the spoken dialogue and it will be done only once and during the first time it is used in each episode.

    For example:
    Line: Chae Ri and I really like drinking soju.
    (Soju - native Korean distilled alcohol)

    For words with two different meanings such as “oppa”, specify which one is used in the line.

    For example:
    Line 1: Oppa and I are getting engaged next week!
    (Oppa - Older brother)

    Line 2: Oppa cheated on me with the evil eonni.
    (Oppa – boyfriend; Eonni - Older sister)

    Line 3. Sung Yun oppa gave Eun Sung eonni 10 000 Won.

    Note to CTS Timer Team: Please make sure you edit the timing a bit so that it would be easier for the viewers to easily see the full text. This is to prevent the subtitles and contextual meanings to flash by the screen.

    For more information about Korean terms, you can read the topics below.

    CTS Guide 1 – BASIC TERMS & TITLES
    CTS Guide 2 – SAGEUK LEXICON for Historical Dramas


    6. Grammar in respect to the dialogue

    Each line will not necessarily be counted as its own sentence. We will now create the right grammar structure and pauses that matches how and what the speaker is saying. Since we are editing lines based on the speaker’s dialogue, these rules must be followed.

    Don’t capitalize all the first words. Follow the correct flow of the sentence.
    Don’t end all lines with a period or a comma.

    Sample sentence: So, can you explain to us the autopsy that you performed.
    The dialogue will be split into three lines, hence this is what you create:

    Line 1: So,
    Line 2: can you explain to us the autopsy
    Line 3: that you performed.

    Incorrect:
    Line 1: So,
    Line 2: Can you explain to us the autopsy.
    Line 3: That you performed.


    7. Grammatical Person

    Convert third person to its correct form. Conversations in Korean are sometimes in the third person form even if they are talking to the person directly. Here is an example between two people:

    Line 1. In seonbae’s eyes, am I still that ignorant girlfriend?
    (Seonbae - Senior, mentor)
    Line 2. Don’t treat me like seonbae used to!
    Line 3. Now, I am the prosecutor responsible for this case.
    Line 4. Seonbae just needs to perform the autopsy for the corpse of the table, that’s all!

    In this standpoint it looks like the speaker is talking about a third person (Seonbae) but in reality the speaker is talking directly to that person.  To correct this confusion it should be edited like this:

    Line 1. Seonbae, in your eyes am I still that ignorant girlfriend?
    (Sunbae- Senior, mentor)
    Line 2. Don’t treat me like you used to!
    Line 3. Now, I am the prosecutor responsible for this case.
    Line 4. All you need to do is perform the autopsy for the corpse on that table.






    B. FORMAT


    Basic Guide:. You can find this in all modules (translator, editor, elite). Just click and you are done.
    FormatSymbols.jpg


    1. Cutting long lines

    Long lines should be cut/split into two or three depending on its length. We cannot control the settings of the video players used by the people who download the subs. So to be safe, do not let one line reach the right side of the box (edge) in the web translator/editor module. 

    Example:
    line1.jpg

    Make 2 lines from that one long line by simply pressing the ‘Enter key’. DO NOT use the < br > </ br> because srt files won’t allow it. The line should look like this:

    http://img.photobuck...S/LineSplit.jpg



    2. Two Characters Speaking in One Scene/Line

    If there is more than one character speaking, use a hyphen to differentiate the lines, put a space between the hypen and the first word.

    Example
    Line 1.
    - Teacher, is this correct?
    - Yes it is.



    3. When to use Italics

    3.1. Flashbacks, hallucinations, and dreams
    Use Italics for short flashbacks. Most flashbacks last for only seconds, but in rare cases there are those that last for 15 to 20 mins, so to be specific - Short flashback is only up to 20 minutes max. For flashbacks longer than 20 minutes use the regular format. Speaking lines during hallucinations and dreams are also to be italicized.

    3.2. Read my mind
    There are times when the characters think aloud. This is when a character is not opening his mouth to speak but his voice is heard. This also happens when a character is mute or deaf and uses sign language. In such cases use italics.

    3.3. Unseen Speaker

    Use italics when the line delivered came from a character who is NOT focused on screen. The simplest example is when a character is eavesdropping. Refer to the scenes from Greatest Love below (2nd post).



    4. When to use the Symbols

    4.1. Explanations

    Use -= =- for translation of written words such as visually shown written media (newspapers, letters, Ids, SMS, text message, written text on the phone) and onscreen explanations that comes with the RAW videos.

    Examples:
    written outside the office door: -=Chairman Go Il Jung=-
    Title of the newspaper article: -=Two bodies were found near the river bank.=-
    explanation written onscreen: -=Ecchymosis: Capillaries when damaged by trauma, allowing blood to leak into the surrounding interstitial tissues. It is commonly seen around the eyes of a suffocated victim=-

    4.2. Audio

    Use = = if the spoken dialogue is coming from an audio media such as a television reporter, a radio announcer or a phone conversation. This is to differentiate the dialogues of the actors from those delivered by the reporters on television and radio.

    For example:
    Line 1. The body will be delivered to NFS.
    =Seo Yoon Hyung’s death was a huge shock to everybody.= (heard via radio while Line 1 is being said)

    4.3. Lyrics

    The only lyrics that will be translated are the ones that are sung by the cast members. The lyrics will be in italics and both ends with have a tilde ~. Click the Lyrics button and you will see:

    ~<i> Yes, I have a dream.</i> ~

    It should come out as:
    ~ Yes, I have a dream. ~

    Dream High is one show where you can find this.

    The dialogue or conversation is always the priority so background music will not be translated and edited in the subtitles, BUT in case the Chinese subtitles that are supplied to us have already translated the background music, then we shall translate and edit them. The lyrics must also follow the Standard English grammatical structure.

    Do not mix the lyrics with the dialogue. Dialogues should always be first and lyrics are below.

    For example:
    Line 1: I wish you were here with me.
    ~ Yes, I have a dream. ~

    4.4. Interrupted lines

    This happens when the speaker is not able to finish what he/she is saying because another character suddenly interjected/butted in or when the speaker just simply stopped talking for some reason and the line was left hanging. In such cases use double hyphen --“ to indicate that the line is unfinished.

    Example:

    Line 1: This institution values honestly, integrity, and loyal--
    Line 2: Liar! You are the most dishonest man I know.



    5. Numbers

    5.1. Money
    The Korean currency is Won but there is also the word 'won' in English which is totally different, so to differentiate the two, we will have to capitalize Won if it pertains to money.

    Also for money matters, do not convert the money to dollars or other currency. Retain whatever is said in the scene and don't use any marks, example:

    Do not do this:
    10.000 Won
    10,000 Won

    Do this: 10 000 Won

    For 100000 and above write "100 thousand Won" instead of "100000 Won". If it reaches a million, write the word million and not the zeros. In rare cases when the number is complicated such as 1 678 567 - just write the numbers separated by spaces.

    Examples:
    Line 1: Gu Il Jeong paid 550 thousand Won
    Line 2: I'll ask him to pay more... probably 1 million!

    5.2. Age, Counting and other number

    All numbers will be written as numerals: 1, 2, 3 and so on or I, II, III - depending on the situation. This means you don't need to spell the numbers, unless the scene requires you to spell them - example if the character is literally spelling the number.

    Do this:
    Line 1: How old are you?
    Line 2: I'm 5 years old.
    Line 3: How many brothers do you have?
    Line 4: 2.
    Line 5: Let's play. At a count of 10 I want you to hide.
    Line 6: 1... 2... 3...
    Line 7: 4.
    Line 8: 5.

    Not this:
    Line 1: How old are you?
    Line 2: I'm five years old.
    Line 3: How many brothers do you have?
    Line 4: Two.
    Line 5: Let's play. At a count of 10 I want you to hide.
    Line 6: One. Two. Three.
    Line 7: Four.
    Line 8: Five.


    POST YOUR COMMENTS/SUGGESTIONS/REACTIONS -- HERE

    Edited by milkyway, 25 May 15 - 02:19 PM.

    • S.A.M, nonski, krstjb and 13 others like this

    Carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero.

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    [Thanks Kristy for the siggy! :)]


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    #2  WaGGy

    WaGGy

      DSS Administrative Founder

    •  Founder
    • Others:
      CTS Editor
      CTS Elite
      CTS Translator (K)
      Donators

    • PipPipPipPip
    • 362 posts
      • Time Online: 50d 8h 50m 55s
  • Local Time: Mar 28 17 02:13 PM
    • Referred By:Soompi
    • Star sign:Virgo

    Posted 27 Feb 12 - 05:12 PM

    WHEN TO USE ITALICS



    Photos are taken from Greatest Love Episode 9.

    Posted Image
    Dok Go Jin heard his manager and Rep. Moon talking. The line was delivered by the manager.

    Posted Image
    Dok Go is now seen onscreen together with the two people discussing inside the room. The manager is talking and Rep. Moon is listening ----> in cases such as this, ALL lines will NOT be italicized since the characters are seen. If it happens that Rep. Moon will have a line in this situation - even if it is just her back or hand or whatever, the line will NOT be italicized. Also, if Dok Go will have a line this scenario (let's say he would interrupt the conversation of Rep. Moon & the manager) - even if he is standing outside room, his lines will also NOT be italicized.

    Let's twist it a bit --- take that particular scenario above BUT remove Dok Go Jin there, let's say he is still walking towards the door. If Dok Go will shout or speak from where he is and his booming voice will be heard by Rep. Moon and the manager (hinting that he is coming) - Dok Go's line WILL BE italicized.


    Posted Image
    ^^ I hope this is understood now.


    Posted Image
    In this scene - both italics and normal typeface was used. The first line was Dok Go's and the second line was the manager --- see the difference?


    I hope everything is clear.:)
    • S.A.M, bond007 and RBana like this

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